Blog Archives

How does Knowledge translation relate to evidence-based practice?

The most common definition of Evidence-Based Practice (EBP) describes the explicit use of current best evidence in making decisions about individual patient care. It means integrating research evidence, with clinicians’ expertise and patient values. Over the last 20 years, the

Posted in barriers, behaviour, clinical improvement, clinician expertise, evidence-based practice, facilitators, health care services, knowledge translation, Uncategorized

How research can improve patient care?

Life-changing research can only benefit patients if they receive an appropriate intervention (as part of normal clinical care)  implemented in the way it was designed. We need to reduce the time lag, currently estimated at 17 years, between research discovery

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Posted in collaboration, culture, health care services, implementation, improvement, organisation, patients, research culture, sustainability, using research

Building research capacity: to translate knowledge from research to clinical environments?

I first wrote about capacity building activities in primary health care back in 2003; as a strategy to facilitate clinicians to use, participate in and lead research. We highlighted the cultural divide between the almost independent industries of research production

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Posted in allied health clinicians, clinical improvement, collaboration, networks, organisational development, research capacity, research methods

Quality decision making – a dangerous idea to fix EBM?

I am writing this blog to complement a podcast I made at the recent EvidenceLive conference in Oxford.  We were asked to propose a dangerous idea in relation to the future of EBM, and then to suggest a solution. My

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Posted in clinician expertise, evidence-based practice, local context, mindlines, patient preference, patient values, research evidence, shared decision making

Learning experiences from translating knowledge

Here’s a quick summary from 2 wonderful presenters during last week’s module “Knowledge into Action” I suggest that these shared learnings might be a useful guide to check individual progress during projects that aim to use research evidence to improve

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Posted in change, clinical practice, complex interventions, implementation, knowledge translation

Logic Models: what, why, how?

A recent article emphasised the power of using theory to explain why improvement programmes work. When key components of an intervention can be identified and their theoretical contribution to final outcomes understood, causal associations can be identified and tested. Although

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Posted in behaviour, change, complex interventions, context, organisation, theories

Stakeholders: key to understanding context?

How should you decide which aspects of context to analyse in order to apply research to improve clinical practice? Can I suggest that stakeholders who have high interest, influence and power are best able to identify the key aspects of

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Posted in clinical practice, context, culture, evidence, health care services, improvement, leadership

Why test theory fidelity?

Recent guidance about developing and evaluating complex interventions emphasises the need to use theoretical explanations to aid understanding of what works within an intervention. This is in direct contrast to the large research literature about drug studies, where human physiology

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Posted in behaviour, change, complex interventions, implementation, intervention, realist review, theory fidelity

new methodologies for EBM?

Trisha Greenhalgh opened the 1st Realist Evaluation and Synthesis conference in Liverpool last week with the question Should we align realist methodology and evidence-based medicine? She surveyed the audience to reveal a lot of uncertainty. She referred to the RealEBM

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Posted in Evidence-Based Medicine, methodology, RealEBM, realist review

Different circumstances different outcomes

In my quest to better understand which aspects of the local environment influence the way complex interventions are delivered, I was alerted to a comprehensive realist review of human resource management interventions that were designed to improve health workers’ performance

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Posted in behaviour, complex interventions, culture, implementation, improvement