Blog Archives

Learning experiences from translating knowledge

Here’s a quick summary from 2 wonderful presenters during last week’s module “Knowledge into Action” I suggest that these shared learnings might be a useful guide to check individual progress during projects that aim to use research evidence to improve

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Posted in change, clinical practice, complex interventions, implementation, knowledge translation

Logic Models: what, why, how?

A recent article emphasised the power of using theory to explain why improvement programmes work. When key components of an intervention can be identified and their theoretical contribution to final outcomes understood, causal associations can be identified and tested. Although

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Posted in behaviour, change, complex interventions, context, organisation, theories

Why test theory fidelity?

Recent guidance about developing and evaluating complex interventions emphasises the need to use theoretical explanations to aid understanding of what works within an intervention. This is in direct contrast to the large research literature about drug studies, where human physiology

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Posted in behaviour, change, complex interventions, implementation, intervention, realist review, theory fidelity

Leaders vs Managers when implementing improvement?

What if I answer my question in the first sentence, saying both are important – will you read on to find out more? It is common to summarise differences between leadership and management; The manager’s job is to plan, organize

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Posted in change, implementation, improvement, leadership, management

Do theories make knowledge more understandable?

When learning about a new or complex area, it is often difficult to know where to start to make sense of different observations, to identify which components are important, and how to link similar things together. Knowledge itself is often

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Posted in behaviour, change, improvement, information, theories, thinking

Disruptive thinking – how does it help?

Most of us do what we have always done. In fact, craziness has been defined as expecting something different when you do as you always have done! So how do we change or improve our practice? Often, it starts with

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Posted in behaviour, change, knowledge, thinking

Interpreting research evidence, from there to here

A key challenge in using research in practice is knowing how to interpret and translate results. Even when we have clear results from a well designed randomised controlled trial (RCT), there is a challenge in understanding and interpreting the results.

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Posted in change, complex interventions, context, implementation, intervention, sustainability

Why is context important in healthcare improvement?

Context is the new keyword to describe the conditions present in the environment when an intervention is carried out to improve healthcare. It is usually excluded from controlled experimental studies, so that the treatment effect can be attributed to the

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Posted in change, complex interventions, context, implementation, improvement, intervention, organisation

What skills do you need to improve?

Many of us have accepted challenges to improve a service in which we have worked. Sometimes we were successful. But often when were not, we just moved on to a different place and project. Sometimes lessons have been learned, but

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Posted in change, implementation, improvement, leadership, learning, management, organisation

Does research knowledge change clinical practice?

When we teach clinicians the skills of  evidence-based practice (EBP), we encourage them to search for and critically appraise research  evidence to answer their clinical questions. Then, we expect them to apply this research evidence to improve their clinical practice,

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Posted in change, complex interventions, evidence-based practice, implementation, knowledge translation, organisation, sustainability, using research