Blog Archives

Learning experiences from translating knowledge

Here’s a quick summary from 2 wonderful presenters during last week’s module “Knowledge into Action” I suggest that these shared learnings might be a useful guide to check individual progress during projects that aim to use research evidence to improve

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Posted in change, clinical practice, complex interventions, implementation, knowledge translation

Logic Models: what, why, how?

A recent article emphasised the power of using theory to explain why improvement programmes work. When key components of an intervention can be identified and their theoretical contribution to final outcomes understood, causal associations can be identified and tested. Although

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Posted in behaviour, change, complex interventions, context, organisation, theories

Why test theory fidelity?

Recent guidance about developing and evaluating complex interventions emphasises the need to use theoretical explanations to aid understanding of what works within an intervention. This is in direct contrast to the large research literature about drug studies, where human physiology

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Posted in behaviour, change, complex interventions, implementation, intervention, realist review, theory fidelity

Different circumstances different outcomes

In my quest to better understand which aspects of the local environment influence the way complex interventions are delivered, I was alerted to a comprehensive realist review of human resource management interventions that were designed to improve health workers’ performance

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Posted in behaviour, complex interventions, culture, implementation, improvement

Can context explain heterogeneity in complex interventions?

Complex interventions are usually defined as containing several interacting components. These components usually include people (researchers), who are  trying to influence other people (healthcare professionals) to do, or not do something (adhere to clinical guideline recommendations). Some common complex interventions

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Posted in complex interventions, implementation

Interpreting research evidence, from there to here

A key challenge in using research in practice is knowing how to interpret and translate results. Even when we have clear results from a well designed randomised controlled trial (RCT), there is a challenge in understanding and interpreting the results.

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Posted in change, complex interventions, context, implementation, intervention, sustainability

Why is context important in healthcare improvement?

Context is the new keyword to describe the conditions present in the environment when an intervention is carried out to improve healthcare. It is usually excluded from controlled experimental studies, so that the treatment effect can be attributed to the

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Posted in change, complex interventions, context, implementation, improvement, intervention, organisation

Does research knowledge change clinical practice?

When we teach clinicians the skills of  evidence-based practice (EBP), we encourage them to search for and critically appraise research  evidence to answer their clinical questions. Then, we expect them to apply this research evidence to improve their clinical practice,

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Posted in change, complex interventions, evidence-based practice, implementation, knowledge translation, organisation, sustainability, using research

Theories help explain interventions

Complex and behavioural interventions are not well understood in healthcare practice. Using theory to design, measure, implement and interpret research can help identify which interventions work and how they work. Commonly, a theory provides a description of important concepts and

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Posted in behaviour, complex interventions, using research